The most common use of bone grafting is in the application of dental implants to restore the edentulous area of a missing tooth. Dental implants require sound bone in order to ossointegrate.

Bone grafts come in various forms such as autologous (from the same person e.g. hip, rib, fibula), Allograft (donor bone), Xenograft (mainly bovine bone), and Alloplastic materials. Bone grafts can be used prior to implant placement or simultaneously.

People who have been edentulous (without teeth) for a prolonged period may not have enough bone left in the necessary locations. In this case, bone can be taken from the chin, from the pilot holes for the implants, or even from the iliac crest of the pelvis and inserted into the mouth underneath the new implant.

Dental bone grafting is a specialized surgical procedure that has been developed to reestablish lost jawbone. This loss can be a result of dental infection of abscess, periodontal disease, or trauma. There are various reasons for replacing lost bone tissue and encouraging natural bone growth, and each technique tackles jawbone defects differently. Reasons that bone grafting might be needed include sinus augmentation, socket preservation, ridge augmentation, or regeneration.